Throughout history, there have been periods where people indulged in conspicuous consumption way too much. There were also times when minimalism took centre stage. In recent years, it has been a battle between owning designer brands and living an organised, almost Zen-like lifestyle.

For those who want to accept the minimalist lifestyle, every single worldly possession is put under the microscope. It may seem intimidating, but is shouldn’t be. Here are three life aspects that you have to change for you to be a successful minimalist:

Home

Downsizing is not just for empty-nesters, or parents whose adult children have already moved out. The switch to a smaller house may also be the first and most integral step to take when you decide to take on the minimalist lifestyle.

To put it simply, you are looking for house and land packages in Victoria that will only be enough for what you truly need to thrive in Melbourne West. Don’t get the wrong idea, though. A minimalist lifestyle does not mean you will have to live in a house as small as a matchbox. Whatever the size that can house your basic necessities, that is the ideal downsized home for you.

Wardrobe

color coded wardrobeClothes make up most of the clutter that accumulates in a house. It is easy to collect many pieces of clothing, thanks to mass-produced designs and fast fashion brands. These are not of the best quality, and some of them may have been sitting in the closet for years.

The only reason you have not parted with them yet is you have grown sentimental over them. Perhaps you bought them during a momentous occasion, or they might have been given to you by someone special. Perhaps you were wearing them for a special event.

To live a minimalist lifestyle, your wardrobe will need a good trim. Sift through all your clothes and keep only those that still have a place in your future. For sentimental items, consider repurposing them into something you can use but will not take too much space.

Miscellaneous

Before you even think that you do not have a problem in this department, look around you for small trinkets lying around. How many unused notebooks or pens do you have? What do you keep in your garage, taking up space that should be going to your car? How many of the books you have at home have you actually read or plan to read?

Each part of a minimalist home should have a purpose. You may even want to switch to multifunctional furniture and appliances. Those trinkets you have accumulated because you feel that you will need them in the future? They have to go.

Your preparedness is not measured in how many ropes you have, but rather it relies on how many kinds of knot you can make. It is your skill, which does not take up physical space, that will prepare you for the unforeseen.

Living a minimalist lifestyle is all about keeping a clear mind and clean, well-organised surroundings. You may have to get rid of things you don’t use, but frankly, if you don’t use them, they deserve to go.